Friday, July 14, 2017

naked ejuice

A bottle of Naked Juice might seem pretty healthy — they're brightly colored and printed with fruits and veggies — but yesterday PepsiCo was sued by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) for misleading consumers with claims that the drinks are healthier than they actually are, according to Business Insider.

The CPSI argues that Naked Juices uses deceptive terms and taglines like "only the best ingredients" or "the goodness inside" to market the juices and smoothies, when really they're just made from cheap, nutrient-poor fruit juices. Oh, goodness.


Naked Juices also rattle off the impressive list of different fruits and vegetables that are jam-packed into the drinks on the side of the bottle. For example, Naked claims that a 15.2 ounce bottle of the Pomegranate Berry Pure Fruit drink has 1½ pomegranates, 23 blueberries, ½ apple, 34 red grapes and 34 white grapes inside.

They also label that the juices have "No Sugars Added," which could very well be true, but even without added sugars, all that fruit adds up to about 61 grams of sugar, which is 20 more grams of sugar than a 12 oz. can of regular Pepsi soda. The first ingredient on the alleged "Pure Fruit" drink is also, "pomegranate juice from concentrate," not even real pomegranates — womp, womp.


Naked Juice drinks are most definitely a no-no, but London points out that even when you drink a fresh-squeezed fruit or vegetable juice, you usually drink way over the recommended ½ cup or four ounce serving size. "Plus, the concentrated sugar in juice is still higher in calories and lower in nutritional value than eating a whole fruit," she says. "You're much better off eating whole produce, which is chock-full of filling fiber and a slew of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals that are crucial to maintaining and promoting health." Sorry, folks, that's just the naked truth.

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